History Japan & Korea

Something I did not know about about the “comfort women” …

until I read this was that their fellow Koreans had once ostracized them. Today, Koreans venerate them. Does this mean that one day, South Koreans might have more compassion for North Koreans, or is this a case of “hate isn’t the opposite of love; indifference is”?

3 Comments

  1. These Halmoni overcame their shame and became role models.

    South Koreans must learn to respect North Koreans as members of the family – and not just welcome them as victims, but as people who have the potential to bring a lot to society.




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  2. I didn’t know this either, but I shouldn’t be surprised. When Marta Hellers published her account of the rapes German women had to endure at the hands of the Soviet military after World War II, she did it anonymously. That was a wise choice, because her book was met with outrage and cries that it besmirched the honor of German women. But the problem wasn’t the shame of the rape victims, it was the shame of the men who could not prevent them. Likewise, cool attitudes towards North Koreans probably mask some sort of shame and feeling of emasculation over having a divided nation.




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