So, what “appropriate measures” *did* the feds take against Dennis Rodman for violating N. Korea sanctions?

The newest U.N. Panel of Experts report* on North Korea sanctions enforcement contains this buried treasure:

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The first question this raises is what those appropriate measures were. The use of passive voice conceals whether the feds took any measures at all.

The second question is why there should be a “lack of information” from Rodman, when the Commerce and Treasury Departments have subpoena powers and an obligation to cooperate with U.N. authorities enforcing North Korea sanctions. The law applies to superpowers and celebrities, too.

There is video evidence of Rodman personally giving Kim Jong Un banned luxury gifts in violation of Commerce Department regulations and Executive Order 13551. I previously explained here why that’s a felony, and there’s no question that at least some of the goods presented are listed on Supplement 1 and were luxury goods.

Don’t get me wrong here. There are bigger fish in this sea than Dennis Rodman. I don’t believe this is the sort of thing that justifies prison time, but it does compel making an example of Rodman and his assortment of camp followers and opportunistic sociopaths, even if only through a modest civil penalty and a (publicly posted) cautionary letter. Ignorance (or willful ignorance) of the law may mitigate punishment, but it’s not a defense.

Having said that, this sort of thing does matter. Cutting off Kim Jong Un’s luxury goods is ultimately about North Korea’s chronic food crisis and the completely needless suffering of its people. The purpose of the ban is to force him to prioritize feeding the 80% of North Koreans who are barely getting through the lean season each year. Conduct like Rodman’s sends a message that the world doesn’t care about their suffering, and that it’s willing to give Kim Jong Un access to the fruits of the world’s fleshpots anyway.

Overall, the POE report paints a picture of a sanctions framework that is being ignored by most U.N. member states. There’s a display of concern when North Korea does something hideous that actually makes headlines, and then everyone goes right back to ignoring them. How are North Korea’s arms clients in Uganda, Tanzania, and Ethiopia supposed to react if the U.S. doesn’t appear to be serious about enforcing them, either?

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* This is from a draft leaked to me; the final still isn’t published.

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